The Ivy and the Kudzu, or, the Lush Perils of Openness in Academe

Plenary Presentation

Thursday, May 12, 1:00 p.m.
Amanda French
(Center for History and New Media)

Abstract

The “EDUPUNK” movement founded or at least coined by UMW’s own Jim Groom is at least partly all about openness and transparency in higher education instruction. Much work by both faculty and students that would have been private in the classroom, or would at least have been hidden behind a Blackboard password, is now available on the open web. Scholarly conferences and scholarly publishing are facing a similar pressure from the conventions that developed in web culture, so that scholarly presentations, articles, and books are now everywhere to be found. This new openness has its prophets both of doom and salvation: will making so much of the product of higher education available for free on the web kill the university press, for instance? Or journals? Or libraries? Or perhaps the university itself? The knowledge that was once content to train neatly and modestly over our brick walls now threatens to blanket the landscape, but perhaps, in the end, that’s a good thing.

3 Responses to “The Ivy and the Kudzu, or, the Lush Perils of Openness in Academe”

  1. […] What are the impediments failing better? And are those anxieties real anxieties, or are they what Amanda French called “the Perils of Pauline”? Is the faculty rut a symptom of the fear of academic […]

  2. […] and though I missed Michael Wesch’s keynote, I did hear Amanda French’s plenary on the The Ivy and the Kudzu, or, the Lush Perils of Openness in Academe–a wonderful model of a talk, merging theoretical reflections with a very clear practical […]

  3. […] and though I missed Michael Wesch’s keynote, I did hear Amanda French’s plenary on the The Ivy and the Kudzu, or, the Lush Perils of Openness in Academe–a wonderful model of a talk, merging theoretical reflections with a very clear practical […]