Archive for the ‘Presentation’ Category

 

Youtubing the Literature Classroom

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Presenter: Maya Mathur

Time: May 12, 9:00-10:15

Location: B122

In the past two years, I have used short YouTube videos — between 4-6 minutes in length — in order to enhance my teaching. Accordingly, in this presentation, I would like to discuss the various uses of these videos in the literature classroom. In lower-level classes such as “Introduction to Literary Studies,” I have drawn on short interviews with prominent theorists or videos illustrating different critical approaches in order to connect abstract theories such as deconstruction or psychoanalysis with concrete examples of how they might be applied to literary or filmic narratives. In upper-level classes on Shakespeare or Renaissance literature, I have mined YouTube for stage and film adaptations of specific scenes from a play; for parodies of well-known plays, speeches, or dramatic texts; imaginative versions of an author’s life and work; and reflections on his or her influence on contemporary culture. In the classroom, YouTube has served as a rich resource for investigating the wide array of performative contexts that are available for studying a literary or dramatic narrative and, in doing so, has helped enhance my students’ understanding of a literary or theoretical work.

15 Things about the Web

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Presenter: Ernest Ackermann

Time: May 12, 10:30-11:45

Location: B122

Teaching a course that is usually done in a semester in a summer session with less than 20 meeting times offers a challenge. This past summer session a course about Internet technology, information, and issues was offered by taking a ’15 Things’ approach. Each meeting featured a feature of the Web. The course was also writing intensive and meets the general education requirement for ‘Global Inquiry.’ Content and student work was primarily done in UMWblogs. See http://theinternet.umwblogs.org for more information about the course.

Using PearNote for Feedback on Student presentations

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Presenter: Anand Rao

Time: May 11, 11:15-12:30

Location: B122

During Fall 2010 I experimented with the use of PearNote to record and comment on student presentations in my Public Speaking class. PearNote records the video and audio and links typed comments to the point in the presentation when they were entered. I will talk about how PearNote works, how it functioned in the classroom during student presentations, and what the students thought of the final product. I will also discuss similar programs and apps that are currently available.

Smartboards and Doc Cams: Innovative Teaching Tools

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Presenter: George Meadows

Time: May 12, 10:30-11:45

Location: B122

Interactive white boards (IWB) and document cameras are now commonplace in a growing number of K-12 classrooms. Many of our incoming students will have seen this technology used on a daily basis and many will have used these tools themselves for creating presentations and reports for class assignments. Integrated document cameras are now starting to appear in a few UMW classrooms as new sympodiums are being installed. At this point though, there are only a few IWB. This presentation provides an introduction to this technology with suggestions for possible classroom use.

I Have a Plan, It’s a System

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Presenter: Sharon Teabo

Time: May 12, 10:30-11:45

Location: B122

This presentation will show the design of a course delivered face-to-face and online. The presentation includes lesson plan structuring, instructional strategies, instructional technologies, assessment, and course management. Lesson plans follow a specific structure that aligns goals, performance criteria, activities and assessments. Having a plan that aligns these components assures that extra activities are not added arbitrarily . One way a course can be assessed is by tracking goals in three domains of learning (cognitive, psychomotor, and affective). The goals can then be categorized on three levels (low, medium, high) to analyze frequency. As an example, the three levels of the cognitive domain would be fact, understanding, and application. If most of a course’s goals are level one, the course should be redesigned so that students are tasked with higher order thinking.

Parts of the lesson plan will be examined and compared between face-to-face and online delivery. It is important to assure that students in both environments experience similar learning tasks. Therefore, instructional strategies will be compared with instructional technologies and delivery formats. Student examples of class projects will provide discussion points of interest.

Strategies for organizing course materials into learning modules will also be discussed. Learning modules contain a lesson plan and all materials a student may need to complete assigned course work. Associated materials may include informational handouts, tutorials, self-assessment survey, video or audio comments and an assessment rubric. Examples of feedback will include digitally marked comments, video and audio responses to assigned work.

There is Life after Powerpoint

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Presenter: Marcel Rotter

Time: May 12, 9:00-10:15

Location: B122

For many academics, PowerPoint is the obvious software choice when they present information, be it at conferences or in the classroom. Following Neil Postman’s dictum that “the medium is the message,” some communication theorists argue that the dominance of PowerPoint affects the way its consumers think. There is a growing resistance to the use of PowerPoint. One can find now conference invitations that warn participants “No PowerPoint presentation!” In addition, students get often wary of some professors’ PowerPoint karaoke in front of text-heavy slides.
This talk explores alternatives to PowerPoint. Its focus is on Prezi, an online-based presentation software, that breaks through the linear presentation style of PowerPoint and fosters a discussion-based approach. I will also talk about the use of smaller programs such as Wordle as presentation tool. I will end with two quick examples for a class and a conference presentation respectively.

Beyond “Chalk & Talk”: Pedagogies for the 21st Century

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Presenters: Steve Greenlaw & Robert Rycroft

Time: May 11, 3:30-4:45

Location: B122

Formal Presentation (1-2 presenters; 15 minutes + Q&A) Do you teach a course with a lot of technical content? Are you interested in ways of teaching that content that are more effective than lecturing? Do you want to successfully reach more than your best students? If so, this session may be for you. Economists have long been criticized for being overly reliant on what is euphemistically called “Chalk & Talk.” Indeed to many economists, innovative teaching means moving the transparencies for your lectures to PowerPoint. In this session, we will offer a different point of view. Specifically, we will discuss our experience with two non-lecture pedagogies: Peer Instruction (Robert) and the “Flipped Classroom” (Steve). We will relate the pros and cons of our experiences with both pedagogies.

How STEM Through Integrative Partnerships, Vision, and a Plan Can Drive Institutional Transformation

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Presenter: Brian Rizzo

Time: May 11, 11:15-12:30

Location: B122

STEM is the where the money is! Where there is money, there is opportunity. Where there is opportunity, there is an increased propensity to succeed. This country’s economic future, national security and global leadership are heavily dependent on the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, or STEM. STEM education is a national concern that will require support and commensurate funding for a decade or more if it is to firmly take root in our educational system. This is not lost on Governor McDonnell, who has made it clear that STEM initiatives are important and will be supported within the state. I present here an approach to STEM that I believe can differentiate UMW from its peers and provide this institution with something unique.

This presentation will make the case for UMW to incorporate the concept of spatial thinking throughout the curriculum. If adopted, the university will be better positioned to attract and respond to NSF STEM based opportunities, expand and develop outreach STEM based opportunities with local and regional partners, attract high school graduates who have been exposed to STEM and would like to continue their STEM education, and provide students with enhanced skills sets that will allow them to better compete for job opportunities. It will also provide a much needed coherent strategy to address STEM as an institution. Finally, this has the potential to differentiate UMW from all other schools in the state by providing us with a unique approach addressing the needs of the future and the needs of the student.

Finding a Fashionable Voice

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Presenter: Kevin McCluskey

Time: May 11, 11:15-12:30

Location: B122

This presentation identifies strategies used to help first year students find their voices when working on final projects for the first year seminar Finding Fashion. Students developed final projects answering one of Lillethun’s fundamental questions of fashion, but most importantly did so in a way that was not only intellectually challenging to them, but in a manner in which they could start to develop their individual voice as a life long learner, paying particular attention to how that voice communicates in the technology heavy 21st century. Not surprisingly most of the students wanted to have a voice that resided in the electronic world. The work of the students formed the foundation for an online, undergraduate journal in fashion theory called: Finding Fashion.

Shifting Focus: Video Art and Mobile Technology

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Presenter: Carole Garmon

Time: May 11, 11:15-12:30

Location: B122

With the advent of smart phones and other mobile devices as tools for making video art, it has become clear that the technical component of a video art course (iMovie/ Final Cut) is no longer key to the success of the young video artist. What remains a constant is the creative approach that a young artist must master in order to use a “tool” to his/her advantage. This semester I shifted the focus on the technical and redirected it to the conceptual. What resulted are fresher and more compelling videos.